Print

Purpose

Emerging adults are a particularly vulnerable group for experiencing the immediate and potentially lifelong negative impacts of habitual cannabis use, and trends suggest that cannabis use disorder (CUD) will soon escalate in this population. The proposed research will combine clinical pharmacology, non-invasive brain stimulation, and neuroimaging techniques to establish the brain mechanisms of cannabinoid-impaired decision-making processes in emerging adults with CUD. Results from this project will inform CUD prevention/treatment efforts in this high-risk group and address a growing public health concern.

Conditions

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Between 18 Years and 34 Years
Eligible Genders
All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
No

Inclusion Criteria

  • Habitual cannabis use problems
  • Body Mass Index ≤30

Exclusion Criteria

  • Past or current serious physical or mental health
  • Sesame seed oil allergy
  • Irregular health issues identified by the Study Physician
  • Standard magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation exclusion criteria (e.g., metal implants, history of epilepsy, etc.)
  • Lack of affective form of birth control (females)
  • Pregnancy (females)

Study Design

Phase
Early Phase 1
Study Type
Interventional
Allocation
Randomized
Intervention Model
Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description
All individuals will receive multiple doses of oral THC (0, 10 and 30mg). Additionally, group 1 will receive excitatory TMS and group 2 will receive inhibitory TMS (real and sham in each group).
Primary Purpose
Basic Science
Masking
Single (Investigator)
Masking Description
Functionality will be tested following combinations of THC and TMS will be tested in randomized, double-blind, placebo- and sham-controlled experiments.

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Experimental
Excitatory TMS
Combinations of THC and excitatory TMS.
  • Drug: Marinol
    Individuals will receive 0, 10, 30mg of Marinol.
    Other names:
    • THC
  • Device: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
    Individuals will receive excitatory or inhibitory TMS
    Other names:
    • TMS
Experimental
Inhibitory TMS
Combinations of THC and inhibitory TMS.
  • Drug: Marinol
    Individuals will receive 0, 10, 30mg of Marinol.
    Other names:
    • THC
  • Device: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
    Individuals will receive excitatory or inhibitory TMS
    Other names:
    • TMS

Recruiting Locations

UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science and nearby locations

Neurobehavioral Systems Lab of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine
Lexington, Kentucky 40507
Contact:
Miranda P Ramirez, BS
859-323-0579
miranda.ramirez@uky.edu

More Details

NCT ID
NCT03944954
Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
University of Kentucky

Study Contact

Miranda P Ramirez, BS
859-323-0579
miranda.ramirez@uky.edu

Detailed Description

This mentored career development award (K01) will enable Dr. Michael J. Wesley to achieve his long-term goal of becoming an independent investigator with a clinical research program examining cannabis use disorder (CUD) in emerging adults, which is a current NIDA funding priority. Dr. Wesley is a new Assistant Professor at the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Medicine. The activities proposed in this award build on Dr. Wesley's background in neuroimaging and drug abuse research and will allow him to accomplish these specific short-term objectives: Become an expert in (1) clinical pharmacology and (2) non-invasive brain stimulation research, and enhance/develop his (3) knowledge of the responsible conduct of research, (4) skills for scientific communication and grant writing, and (5) ability to manage an independent research program. UK has numerous faculty and projects focused on drug abuse research and is an ideal environment for Dr. Wesley to successfully complete this award. Dr. Wesley has assembled a stellar mentoring team consisting of Dr. Josh Lile (Mentor), who runs a successful NIH-funded clinical pharmacology research program at UK and Drs. Mark George (Co-Mentor) and Colleen A. Hanlon of the Brain Stimulation Laboratory at the Medical University of South Carolina, Together they will guide and oversee Dr. Wesley's training in clinical pharmacology, brain stimulation, and scientific communication and grant writing. Dr. Wesley has proposed to engage in a series of formal classes, lab exchanges, and research seminars/meetings that will assist him in accomplishing the objectives of this award.

The proposed research project is novel, innovative, and rigorous. It will combine the acute administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, with brain stimulation and neuroimaging to examine the role of the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and connected brain areas in drug-impaired decision-making processes. Specifically, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) will be used to raise or lower DLPFC functionality following the administration THC in randomized, double-blind, placebo- and sham-controlled experiments.

Aim 1 will test the hypotheses that excitatory TMS (raising DLPFC functionality; Exp. 1) will attenuate, whereas inhibitory TMS (lowering DLPFC functionality; Exp.2) will enhance, the impairing effects of THC on study outcomes.

Aim 2 will use neuroimaging to test the hypothesis that individual differences in brain structure and function predict the specific and/or combined effects of THC and TMS on study outcomes. Results from this project will improve the investigator's understanding of the mechanisms involved in cannabis-impaired decision-making, which will inform CUD management and address a growing public health concern.

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.