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Purpose

Children who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) rarely receive behavioral interventions to prevent the long-term costly outcomes of behavior problems. This project will systematically adapt an evidence-based parent training intervention to increase its acceptability and relevance for parents of young DHH children. Effectiveness of the adapted intervention and its implementation in "real world" hearing healthcare clinics will be assessed.

Conditions

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Between 2 Years and 99 Years
Eligible Genders
All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
No

Inclusion Criteria

  • Parent is age 18 or older
  • Parent is custodial guardian of child
  • Parent can either speak/understand English or use American Sign Language
  • At baseline, child is between the ages of 2 and 5 years
  • At baseline, child lives majority of time in the parent/guardian's home
  • Child is deaf or hard of hearing
  • Child has used hearing aid(s) and/or cochlear implant(s) for greater than 6 months

Exclusion Criteria

  • Active child protective services case is open
  • Parent has already accessed behavioral health services for the child
  • Parent participated in formative research for this study

Study Design

Phase
N/A
Study Type
Interventional
Allocation
Randomized
Intervention Model
Parallel Assignment
Primary Purpose
Prevention
Masking
Single (Outcomes Assessor)

Arm Groups

ArmDescriptionAssigned Intervention
Experimental
Behavioral Parent Training
  • Behavioral: Parent Training Intervention
    Adapted version of the Family Check-Up/Everyday Parenting intervention
No Intervention
Control

Recruiting Locations

More Details

NCT ID
NCT03916146
Status
Suspended
Sponsor
Christina Studts

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from ClinicalTrials.gov (a public registry operated by the National Institutes of Health). The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.